Free this Weekend: Autoimmune solution documentary

So all episodes have been re-posted for FREE until 12pm EST Sunday. Please check them out – they are really useful:

 LIVE Q&A

Episode #1

Episode #2

Episode #3

Episode #4

Episode #5

Episode #6

Episode #7

You’ll get to watch the episode or episodes you missed, or rewatch your favorite episode.

Please give your family and friends this link to get all of the powerful information we have created in this entire Docu-series.

If you’re excited about this please take a moment to leave a comment under the video, we would love to hear from you. I would like to know if this Series has impacted you, and how.

Please take a moment to share this with your loved ones right now. As soon as they start watching, they will be deeply grateful you took the time to share this with them. And the conversations between you on health topics will be at a much deeper level.

… Have you seen the LIVE Q&A yet? 🙂 Go ahead and CLICK HERE to watch it here now to get this vital information.

To your health and happiness,and a life free of suffering and disease,
Dr. Tom O’Bryan and the Betrayal team

MUST-SEE Documentary on auto-immune disease; CAUSES AND Solutions

Episode 1 is a general introduction but episodes are being uploaded and removed daily. Today’s is on gut health PLEASE watch it, you may know lots already but I feel this is a great resource to summarize the important bits. Episode 2 (today’s) is about how digestive issues are a warning sign for auto-immune disease. If you suffer from digestive issues this is for you:

https://betrayalseries.com/episode-2-a5frf01y?inf_contact_key=614bf0088eb522a49b0798ddaae569c01ef2ba0c4d3a6c4a33e306b6c25644a4

Nutritional Ketosis: How Fasting Reduces MS Symptoms

Recently I have noticed that when I do not eat e.g. by waiting a while before eating breakfast in the morning, or through intermittent fasting: finishing dinner at 5 or 6 and then waiting a few hours in the morning before breakfast; I have no or much less MS symptoms. This has been a sum-what problematic discovery for me, as I consider myself to be under weight and am trying to gain not lose weight.

Terry Wahls, in her book has led me to a possible explanation for why fasting feels so good by introducing me to the notion of nutritional ketosis; the acceleration of the production of ketones through the reduction of dietary carbohydrates.

Ketone bodies are a by-product of burning fat. They are small molecules containing energy produced by the liver using fatty acids during periods of low food intake such as fasting or when on low carbohydrate diets. Ketones cross the blood-brain barrier where the brain cells’ mitrochondria can then burn them as fuel. The longer you are in nutritional ketosis, the more enzymes the body will make for burning ketones; the easier it is for it to use them.

Nutritional Ketosis is a mechanism the body has always used to heal and survive at times when food is less available, for our ancestors; this was during winter. During this time the body begins to burn fats instead of carbohydrates. Because modern diets are loaded with carbohydrates, our bodies burn sugar for fuel instead of fats. The latter is easier but not more beneficial. Glycolysis* takes place through fermentation, in the cell cytoplasm, outside of the mitochondria. Sugary, starchy diets cause inflammation.  Burning fat is better for the brain and means our bodies go into the more efficient form of energy production that occurs when we go into ketosis*.

*Glycolysis: spliting of the sugar molecule

*Ketosis: the metabolic state in which the production of ketones is increased

Here is a brilliant video of Mark Mattson’s simple explanation of how neurons grow and synapses are strengthened during intermittent fasting – how it can help reduce inflammation and improve the ability of nerve cells to repair DNA:

Here is another good albeit quite long video on Nutritional ketosis:

 

 

Tis the Season to Have a Relapse

Every year it’s the same. It’s getting boring now. You do too much – just one more thing – just one more and then I’ll rest – just this and then day off – and, before you know it, you can’t do anything anymore, for the next two or even three months. Sound familiar? You go to a wedding, to your boyfriend’s gig, to a baby shower. You’re doing loads, you feel like you again. Nothing crazy, no out-til-6am like the good old days; but maybe until midnight (woohooo) twice in a row (uh-oh). Two places to go in a day – MS Action (home for lunch) then to my sister’s house. Exhausting. Seriously. That’s how it is. I’m feeling tired just thinking about it, (right n0w it’s 8.30 and I’m ready for bed, teeth are clean and at 9 I will be in bed, I assure you. (I will probably finish this post tomorrow.)

As I was saying, you go to a wedding, do the shopping, work on your project. Go to a funeral. For me, grief is definitely the straw that breaks the camel’s back (fav expression of a friend I used to have). How can I describe it? Sadness is heavy. It is a load everyone struggles with. It is something you let yourself give into, in the moment, you stay in it a while longer than your body is telling you you can.

I have been thinking about this relapse problem. I need to learn my lesson, and slow down – especially in winter, when my body is weaker. I need to break the chain, and I am determined not to relapse next year. I will lay low and sit this one out as I must, but next winter I will take it easy until the weather gets warmer, and hopefully, I won’t relapse.

Slow Down!!!

June? Already??!! We are half way through 2014, and I was asked to reflect on it, but do find it a strange time of year to already be doing so. Usually June is busy, not reflective. By June we are all fixed in our routines, and (in Britain at least) dreaming of the promised sunshine. Thinking back on the year gone by usually happens for me all of a sudden somewhere in the middle of November. Now that I think of it, this always happens in November, I don’t really know why. Perhaps because the end of the year is looming and I am thinking about all the things I didn’t quite get round to doing. Looking back through my diaries I can see several ‘November Again’ entries. It is always November that gets me. But perhaps it isn’t a bad idea to look back on the first half of the year, now; that we still have a 6-month-shot at carrying out any plans we had in the New Year.

Now that I look back on the first half of 2014, I realise that something important has changed this year. Something important that I might not have been able to place in time had I not looked back until my customary November panic. As I sit at my desk writing, I am aware of a scruffy list I have placed on top of a messy, and surprisingly high, pile of other lists. In the past, my endless lists, (which are nothing new) would have been a reason to stop writing and get back to work as it were, running and completing errands; reasserting goals, making them more realistic…if not crossing them out altogether! As I sit and reflect on the last six months, I realise that this year has been a bit different to the last few. Although it has raced by, like the last five years or so; faster even, I have felt able to do things in my own time, and for once, not been getting annoyed at myself for not fulfilling my January, February, April goals on time.

Since my diagnosis with Multiple Sclerosis in late 2009, my perception of time has been constantly changing. At first, it was all about doing as much as I could in the time I had left – MS kind of reminded me that we are not here forever. I sort of panicked and decided I needed to focus on things I really wanted to do. I started learning German, took up drawing lessons, learnt to use a sewing machine, really got into yoga, took up the bass guitar, started singing lessons, decided to write a book, all this on top of a new healthy lifestyle, all at roughly the same time (!) Soon I started to work as a teacher full-time, and still had most of these other plans in the back of my mind, picking up one then the other on weekends or holidays and after hours of marking homework!

MS has been a wonderful eye-opener. Although initially I rushed in all directions trying to do everything, it has also made me learn to enjoy the moment, and to reject unnecessary stress and distress. And, gradually, as I have learnt to maintain my health – both physical and mental, it has also made me realise that if I am going to live well for as long as I can, I need to slow down when I have symptoms/relapses – or rather, before they begin at all.

2014, for me has been putting this last, important realisation, into practice. I have lots of goals and lots of things I was expecting to have started this year, that I have not yet been able to. But there is one thing that has really started to change; I have slowed down, and learnt to stop when I need to rest, before reaching the point of no return, the point I always reach; where I have overdone things, again. This, for me, has been a tremendous achievement, and I am working each day to remind myself, that although time is whizzing away, there is no point in doing everything, if it eventually means I will reach a point where I can no longer do anything anymore. I am also very pleased to have stopped like this; mid-year, to notice this change, which I have known for some time now; was a necessary one.

A close friend of mine turned 30 this year, and as I thought about useful things to tell her in this significant year; the year that I too will turn 30; I came across a very wise piece of advice for 30-somethings: You can’t have everything; Focus On Doing a Few Things Really Well. This made a lot of sense to me. Instead of spreading yourself thinly, trying a bit of everything; the key is to try to do fewer things, well, in-depth and whole heartedly.

I feel like the universe has been trying to tell me this since the death of both of my grandmas in late 2013. When my grandmothers of 95 and 89 who had lived 4456 KM away from one another their entire lives, never meeting; died within a month of each other; I felt they were both sending me the same message: that I am not going to live forever, that no one is immortal. In my reading I have come across a similar message. I am currently reading the books of Carlos Castaneda. He relates the teachings of Don Juan, who argues that the only life worth living is that of a warrior; someone who performs every act as if it were their last on earth. The universe is telling me that I will not be here forever and so I’d better get on with my plans, and do them well!

Although I have decided on a few things to focus on, my main personal goal is to stay well, and to do this, I need to continue to take things slowly. So I am not worrying about not accomplishing too much this year; I have already achieved perhaps one of the most important life goals for myself, as part of my management of MS. I hope that you too will have decided on a few important things to focus on; and if you haven’t yet decided/started working on it – you still have six glorious months in which to do so.

Sprouts

Sprouts are very good for the nervous system. During sprouting, minerals bind to protein making it easier for the body to use them, helping the body extract more amino acids, essential fats, minerals and vitamins from the rest of the food you eat.

Seeds and beans become even healthier foods when sprouted before using. Sprouted sunflower seeds are full of iron and chlorophyll – which helps detoxify the liver and blood. Pea and alfalfa* sprouts are also renowned for their excellent properties.

*although Alfalfa seeds are said to be very good for you, they have very high levels of canavanine, an amino acid. Some studies have linked canavanine to the worsening of inflammatory conditions. For this reason, people with MS should sprout other seeds instead.

But why are they so good for our health? When sprouting, seeds convert some of their sugar into vitamin C to use as an antioxidant as it sprouts into the new open air environment. They have more vitamin C at the sprouting stage than later when they mature. They also start synthesizing a range of new enzymes, in order to deal with oxygen metabolism as they sprout above the soil.

Doctors in Germany experimented with around 100 MS patients. The patients were given sprouts and green juices as the main part of each meal. Each of them improved, 15 of them recovering completely.

Sprouts are also rich in silicon, which is good for the skin.

Seeds, beans, chick peas and many other foods are very easy to sprout. Beans and chickpeas can be soaked in water for a few days and they will sprout. Put seeds in a wet glass jar, and leave by the window, in sunlight to sprout. Here is a useful video for sprouting sunflower seeds. After 12 hours of soaking, seeds sprout slightly and become much easier to digest.

In Conclusion: eat more sprouts!!!!